Tag Archives: T.S. Eliot

“Prufrock” Celebrates 100 Years

“Let us go then, you and I, / When the evening is spread out against the sky / Like a patient etherized upon a table.” I didn’t know why my writing professor would often quote those lines in our discussion classes. … Continue reading

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Poem a Day 2014: From Yeats to Auden, Eliot, Brodsky, Walcott, and Heaney (#5)

Stephen Metcalf, Slate critic-at-large, endorsed this article from the LA Review of Books: “Mourning Tongues: How Auden was Modified Through the Guts of the Living,” by Nina Martyris (endorsement here, minute 39:06). While the article is a fascinating look at … Continue reading

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Poem a Day 2014: Eliot’s The Waste Land (#3)

T.S. Eliot’s The Waste Land is a seminal work of high modernist poetry; as I read it for class last fall, I was surprised to find it was quite enjoyable to jump into, despite all the hullabaloo surrounding its famed … Continue reading

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A Poem a Day: Prufrock

Today’s selection is an extract from T. S. Eliot‘s “The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock.” This modernist work meanders through musings, fears, and doubts; it is what Eliot called a “drama of literary anguish” (source below). The entire poem … Continue reading

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